WHAT ARE BZDS FOR?

Regardless of whether benzodiazepines are marketed as anxiolytics, hypnotics or anticonvulsants, the actions in the body are virtually the same for all benzodiazepines. This is true regardless of their potency, speed of elimination or duration of effects.

All benzodiazepines exert five major effects which are used therapeutically: anxiolytic, hypnotic, muscle relaxant, anticonvulsant and amnestic (impairment of memory).

Therapeutic Actions of Benzodiazepines (in short-term use):

ANXIOLYTIC:
Relief of anxiety.
HYPNOTIC:
Promotion of sleep.
MYORELAXANT:
Muscle relaxation.
ANTICONVULSANT:
Treats seizures, fits, convulsions.
AMNESTIC:
Impairs short-term memory.

These actions, exerted by different benzodiazepines in slightly varying degrees, are why benzodiazepines are relevant for use in medicine. Due to their efficacy, rapid onset of action and low acute toxicity, there are not many drugs which can compete with them. Because of this, benzodiazepines can be valuable in medicine, sometimes life-saving, and are useful for treating a wide range of clinical conditions when used short-term. It is important to note that almost all of the disadvantages to benzodiazepine use are a result of long-term administration (using the medications regularly for more than 2-4 weeks). For this reason, the UK Committee on Safety of Medicines recommended that benzodiazepines should be generally be reserved for the short-term use of 2-4 weeks only. If you’re already dependent on a benzodiazepine, abrupt cessation may induce a potentially dangerous withdrawal syndrome and possibly a protracted withdrawal syndrome. It is dangerous to abruptly stop a benzodiazepine after dependency has taken place.

Source: http://benzo.org.uk/manual/bzcha01.htm#24

REASONS WHY PEOPLE HAVE BEEN PRESCRIBED A BENZODIAZEPINE:

This list was compiled by Geraldine Burns, the United States Representative for W-BAD. She surveyed benzodiazepine (BZ) victims who appeared at the ‘Benzo Bill’ hearing in Massachusetts in 2016 as to the condition for which they were initially prescribed BZs.

If you were started on a BZ for a diagnosis or reason not listed here, contact us and we will update the list so that it’s comprehensive.

ADHD
Adhesion Surgery and recovery
Adverse reaction to anesthesia
Adverse reaction to caffeine
Adverse reaction to Effexor
Adverse reaction to Levaquin
Adverse reaction to NSAIDs
Adverse reaction to Paxil
Adverse Reaction to Steroids
Adverse reaction to Zoloft
Agoraphobia
Alcohol-induced panic
Alcohol withdrawals
Alpha wave sleep disorder
Alzheimer’s
Ambien Withdrawals
Antidepressant Withdrawal
Back Injury
Benign Heart PVC
Bipolar
Break Up
Cancer
Cervical Dystonia
Chest Pain
Chronic Fatigue
Chronic Pain
Closed head injury
Comorbidity
Complex PTSD
Crohn’s
Death of a loved one
Depression
Diverticulitis
Divorce
Dizziness
Dyspareunia
Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Hypermobility
Epilepsy
ER visit
Fibromyalgia
Flu

Glycogen storage disease
H Pylori
High Blood pressure
IBS

Indigestion
Insomnia
Itching
Low B12
Low Iron
Lupus
Lyme
Major Depressive Disorder
Meningitis
Menopause
Meth withdrawal
Migraine
Misdiagnosed Anxiety
Mitral Valve Prolapse
Motor tics
Nausea
Neck Spasms
Nerve Pain
Night Terrors/parasomnia
Nocturnal Myoclonic Seizures
OCD
Opiate Addiction
Opiate Withdrawal
Oxycodone withdrawal
Pain
Panic Attacks
Parasites
Perimenopause
Period Limb Movement during sleep/ PLMD
PMDD
PMS
Pneumonia
Postpartum Insomnia
POTS
Psychosis
PTSD
Rash
Restless leg syndrome
“Runny” Ear
Schizophrenia
Seizures
Shortness of Breath
Shyness
Side Effects of Abilify
Side Effects of Lexapro
Side Effects of metoclopramide
Side effects of Wellbutrin
Single Panic Attack
Sleep Paralysis
Spasms
Stiff Back and Muscles
Stress
Tachycardia
Tension Headaches
Tinnitus
Tongue Pain
Tourette Syndrome
Transition onto SSRI
Trauma
Trouble falling asleep
Twitching/Shakes

Undiagnosed Infection
Vertigo
Vestibular Problems
Visual Processing Disorder
Vulvodynia